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IFDH Global Survey Series - #1

Posted by Stella Pascale on Thursday, 26 September 2019 02:35

The IFDH is fielding a survey to better understand global dental hygienists' toothpaste recommendation practices and information resources. 

 

We appreciate if you and your organization distribute this message to your members and encourage them to take to complete this simple, multiple choice survey in the next 45 days, with a deadline of November 15th.

 

It only takes 5 minutes.

Here’s the link for respondents to use: https://www.quicksurveys.com/s/Lt5f3

 

This is the first of a 3-part survey series using Survey Monkey through the end of 2020 (approximately one survey every 6 months), which will provide insights to help us identify opportunities for educational programs. We thank P&G for their support of this program. A summary of results will be jointly developed by IFDH and P&G to post online, share via social media and use in educational programs.

 

Thank you for your support of this program!

 

Peter

 

Peter Anas

Executive Director

director@ifdh.org

 

International Federation of Dental Hygienists

100 South Washington St.

Rockville MD 20850, USA

Phone:  240-778-6790, Press 3

Fax:  240-778-6112

Visit our web site at www.IFDH.o

Expanded Functions 2000 scope (25-29 Nov 2019)

Posted by Stella Pascale on Tuesday, 10 September 2019 22:30

This is a gentle reminder that the University of Pretoria is hosting the Oral Hygienists Expanded Functions 2000 scope in November:

 

Dates: 25-29 Nov 2019

Venue: Oral & Dental Hospital, University of Pretoria

 

Closing date for applications should you have not submitted yet is 25 October 2019.

 

Documents to submit:

  1.        CV
  2.        Copy of qualifications
  3.        Recent proof of registration with HPCSA
  4.        Completed enrolment form (attached)

 

Please do share the word with your colleagues.

 

kind regards,

 

Peggy Motswatswa

Course Coordinator

 

Tel:        +27 (0)12 434 2640

Cell:       +27 (0)83 282 6975

Email:   peggy.motswatswa@enterprises.up.ac.za

Web:     www.enterprises.up.ac.za

 

For all courses please view our catalogue here: http://www.enterprises.up.ac.za/publications/


A company wholly owned by the University of Pretoria.
 

 


Please consider whether it is necessary to print this email.
The information transmitted is intended only for the person or entity to which it is addressed and may contain confidential and/or privileged material. Any review, retransmission, dissemination or other use of, or taking of any action in reliance upon, this information by persons or entities other than the intended recipient is prohibited. The views expressed here are those of the sender and unless expressly stated otherwise are not binding on Enterprises University of Pretoria Pty (Ltd). If you received this in error, please contact the sender and delete the material from any computer.

 

 

This message and attachments are subject to a disclaimer.
Please refer to http://upnet.up.ac.za/services/it/documentation/docs/004167.pdf for full details.

 


Attachments:

Enterprises TS_Enrolment form.pdf 1.4M 10 Sep 19 22:30
Expanded Functions for Oral Hygienists (2000 Scope).pdf 604.9K 10 Sep 19 22:30

Expanded Functions Course 2

Posted by Stella Pascale on Sunday, 8 September 2019 15:15

The University of the Western Cape invites Oral Hygienists for a Course in the Expanded Scope of Practice which includes procedures such as sealant restorations (PRR), periodontal splinting, tooth whitening techniques and procedures, fabrication of vacuum formed mouth guards and the Oral Hygiene Process of Care.

Date of course: 2-6 December 2019.

Cost: R7000.

Please indicate your interest before 25 September 2019 by filling in the attached application form.

Upon receipt of your application, a registration form with details of payment will follow.

Note that should the desired numbers of candidates not be met, the course will be cancelled.

The Regulations defining the Scope of Practice as Gazetted is entitled: Regulations defining the scope of Oral Hygiene-GG 40996/2017 and is available on the HPCSA website (click on the link).

http://www.hpcsa.co.za/PBDentalTherapy/Rules

Please direct all queries regarding the course to Ms Kelly Stuurman 021-9373162 kstuurman@uwc.ac.za


Attachments:

Course 2 Application form Dec 2019.pdf 141.3K 8 Sep 19 15:15

ORAL HYGIENIST position - Polokwane

Posted by Stella Pascale on Saturday, 7 September 2019 23:11

Voldag mondhigiënis benodig in Polokwane, by die praktyk van Drs. Van Reede van Oudtshoorn.

Stuur asb. jou CV na alicia@thedentalstudio.co.za

 

Full day oral hygienist position available in Polokwane at Drs. Van Reede van Oudsthoorn’s practice.

Please submit CV to alicia@thedentalstudio.co.za

Codes 8165 8166 8167 Usage

Posted by Stella Pascale on Saturday, 7 September 2019 22:46

From: Nirvada Niranjan <NNiranjan@sada.co.za>
Date: Fri, Aug 23, 2019 at 4:53 PM
Subject: Code use




 

In a recent meeting we had with GEMS we were advised that the following codes are often used inappropriately. Furthermore, it was highlighted that oral hygienists seemed to be using these interchangeably quite often as well. I am including the below in a future Clinical Advisory Bulletin and thought I would share this with you should you wish to send out something to OHASA members as well.

8165 Sedative filling

This code is used for temporary fillings where the material used has a sedative effect on the pulp. It is not to be used where a sedative liner/base is used under a permanent resin or amalgam restoration. Liners and/bases cannot be billed separately from the resin or amalgam restoration. Sedative fillings are generally used to relieve acute pain. They may also be used in conjunction with the Atraumatic restorative technique, code 8228, where caries is removed with hand instruments only.

 

8166 Application of desensitising resin

8167 Application of desensitising medicament

Material is an adhesive resin

Flouride-based or other gel/paste medicament

Light cured, bonded to tooth or root surface

Topically applied

Technique sensitive and may require tooth isolation

Generally no isolation required

Billed per tooth

Billed per visit irrespective of number of teeth

 


Kind regards
 
Dr Nirvada Niranjan   |  Manager Clinical Support Services
South African Dental Association

E: nniranjan@sada.co.za
T: 011 484 5288   |  F: 086 557 2335
 

The Sparkle Brush Program, South Africa wins The Social Responsibility Program at the ISDH in Brisbane, Australia

Posted by Stella Pascale on Wednesday, 21 August 2019 01:13

The Sparkle Brush Program, South Africa wins The Social Responsibility Program at the ISDH in Brisbane, Australia.

Thank you to the UWC and UKZN Team, Colgate teams from KZN and WC, Johnson & Johnson, Wright Milliners, BOH 111 UWC and our graphic illustrator Pravar Naidoo for their contribution towards the success of this program .

A victory to the entire Sparkle Team.

 

 

National Health Insurance Booklet

Posted by Stella Pascale on Saturday, 17 August 2019 06:52

IFDH June eNews

Posted by Stella Pascale on Monday, 3 June 2019 07:38

IFDH eNewsletter, outlining all of our news and programs.

  link below:

o   Website News box and Publications page

o   eNewsletter, if you have one

o   Printed Newsletter

http://www.ifdh.org/newsletter/ifdh-enews-june-2019.html

  

 

Guidance on obtaining consent of patients

Posted by Stella Pascale on Friday, 15 March 2019 23:24

Guidance on obtaining consent of patients

Council and the Professional Boards under its ambit has noted that the guideline provided to practitioners by Council in fulfilments of its mandate in terms of section 15A(h) of the Health Professions Act in August 2017 has caused confusion to practitioners in terms of the requirement of obtaining consent from patient to release their treatment records to the medical schemes. Council views the conduct by Medical schemes of using the HPCSA as a tool to threaten, coerce and harass practitioners into signing settlement agreements as unlawful.

Through this revised guide, Council wishes to clarify the issue of obtaining consent from patients as follows:

Access by a medical scheme to the member’s clinical records held by a practitioner

In terms of Regulation 15J(2) of the Medical Schemes Act Regulations, a medical scheme is entitled to access any treatment record held by a managed health care organization or health care provider and other information pertaining to the diagnosis, treatment and health status of the beneficiary in terms of a contract entered into pursuant to regulation 15A, but such information may not be disclosed to any other person without the express consent of the beneficiary. This entitlement is subject to the prescribed requirements for disclosure of confidential information in terms of section 14 and 15 of the National Health Act 61 of 2003 and Ethical Rules of Conduct for Practitioners registered under the Health Professions Act, 1974 as published under Government Notice R717 in Government Gazette 29079 of 4 August 2006. Practitioners are therefore required by law to disclose or release the treatment records of their patients to the medical scheme without having to obtain the written consent of their patients.

Prosecution of practitioners involved in fraudulent activities

In terms of Section 66(2) of the Medical Schemes Act, a practitioner registered under the Health Professions Act may not be prosecuted under the Medical Schemes Act as an act of unprofessional conduct by practitioners registered with the HPCSA is punishable under the Health Professions Act. Section 16 of the Medical Schemes Act places an obligation for the Council for Medical Schemes to report cases of improper or disgraceful conduct (Unprofessional Conduct) to a medical scheme by practitioners registered with HPCSA to the HPCSA as the statutory body which has jurisdiction over practitioners registered under the Health Professions Act. Where an offence has been committed, the Council for Medical Schemes is obliged to refer such a matter to the National Prosecuting Authority. The medical schemes cannot discipline or prosecute health practitioners for unprofessional conduct but may report practitioners to HPCSA for unprofessional conduct or report any offence to the South African Police Services.

Section 34 of the Prevention and Combating of Corrupt Activities Act 12 of 2004 requires that anyone in position of authority or an entity (medical schemes, HPCSA, etc.) that suspects or has knowledge that a practitioner has been involved in a fraudulent activity that involves an amount of R100 000 or more to report such knowledge or suspicion to the South African Police Services. Failure of such a person or entity to comply with this provision of law constitutes an offence under the Act mentioned above.

Practitioners are advised that those found guilty of unprofessional conduct involving fraud amounting to R100 000 or more will not only be subjected to penalties imposed in terms of Section 41 of the Health Professions Act but Council will also report such practitioners to SAPS in terms of the Prevention and Combating of Corrupt Activities Act.

Recovery of benefits paid bona fide to a practitioner who was not entitled to receive such benefits

Section 59(3) of the Medical Schemes Act empowers the medical scheme to recover any amount which has been paid bona fide to which a practitioner is not entitled to or any loss which has been sustained by the medical scheme through theft, fraud, negligence or any misconduct which comes to the notice of the medical scheme.

The question is: How does the medical scheme recover such an amount?
a. by deducting such amount from any benefit payable to the health practitioner. Council advises practitioners that the agreements they reach with the medical schemes should be as prescribed in terms of this section of the Medical Schemes Act.
Or
b. Through any other lawful arrangement made with a practitioner to reimburse the scheme.

Legal status of payment arrangements made between health practitioners and medical schemes

The payment arrangements between practitioners and the scheme are legally binding if they are lawful. An example of an unlawful agreement is one which is reached with a condition that the medical scheme will not report a practitioner to any organ of state, including the HPCSA on a matter that such an organ of state has jurisdiction over. Although Medical Schemes may exercise their choice in terms of reporting unprofessional conduct to the HPCSA, they have a duty in terms of common law and section 66 of the Medical Schemes Act to report practitioners to the HPCSA.

Withholding of claims due to practitioners by medical schemes

In terms of Section 59(2) of the Medical Schemes Act, the scheme should pay a claim either to the member or practitioner within 30 days of receiving the claim. According to Regulation 6 of the Medical Schemes Act Regulations, if a medical scheme is of the opinion that an account, statement or claim is erroneous or unacceptable for payment, it must inform both the member and the relevant health care provider within 30 days after receipt of such account, statement or claim that it is erroneous or unacceptable for payment and state the reasons for such an opinion and the member or health practitioner has sixty days to correct and resubmit such account or statement. Where the medical scheme has failed to either notify the member or health care provider within 30 days that an account/statement/claim is erroneous or unacceptable for payment, OR fails to provide an opportunity for correction and resubmission, the medical schemes bears the onus of proving that such account/statement/claim is, in fact, erroneous or unacceptable for payment when there is a dispute. Practitioners are advised to report medical schemes who unlawfully withhold claims due to them to the Council for Medical Schemes.

Conclusion

Council and the Professional Boards under its ambit do not condone any form of fraud and as a result, the investigation of complaints of alleged fraud by practitioners registered under the Act has been intensified to fulfil Council and the Professional Boards’ function of maintaining and enhancing the dignity of the relevant health professions and the integrity of the persons practicing such professions.

Published Articles Health24

Posted by Stella Pascale on Sunday, 21 October 2018 01:51

https://www.health24.com/PartnerContent/bleeding-gums-what-it-means-and-why-smokers-need-to-be-extra-careful-20181015 

 

Bleeding gums: What it means and why smokers need to be extra careful!

2018/10/15 3:57:06 PM

Did you know that 80% of all teeth lost in the mouth is due to gum disease? Scary stuff if you consider that bleeding gums are the first sign of gum disease.  

But there’s a silver lining to this shocker. “The dental field is lucky as we know exactly what the cause of oral diseases like tooth decay and gum disease are and that is plaque,” Angelique Kearney, president of the Oral Hygienist Association of South Africa, explains. 

Why do gums bleed?  

Healthy gums do not bleed! If you have bleeding gums when brushing or flossing your teeth, you have gingivitis or gum infection, according to Kearney. Although infection of the gum surrounding the tooth is the most common reason why gums bleed, there are other conditions that can also cause bleeding gums.  

“Recent research supports the findings that bleeding gums and an unhealthy mouth has a link with uncontrolled diabetes, high blood pressure, premature birth weight of babies and cholesterol,” Kearney says.  

According to Dr Welgemoed, a professional dentist at Longbeach Dental Noordhoek, other reasons for bleeding gums can include:  

·         Hormonal changes during pregnancy and adolescence 
·         Side effects from medication 
·         Malnutrition 
·         Ulcers  
·         Dental Abscess 
·         Oral Cancers 

What can happen if bleeding gums stay untreated? 

If gingivitis is not treated, the infection of the gums can spread to the bone surrounding the teeth. This is called periodontitis and is more difficult to treat. Untreated periodontitis leads to bone loss around the teeth, resulting in teeth getting mobile or loose which in turn leads to the early loss of healthy teeth, according to Dr Welgemoed.  

Why smokers are at risk of periodontal disease 

“Patients who smoke don`t usually experience bleeding gums because of the constriction of the blood vessels of the gums due to the heat,” explains Kearney, who is also an associate lecturer at Wits University. However, that doesn’t mean smokers have dodged the bullet of gum disease.  

On the contrary, smokers are at a very high risk of developing periodontal disease, according to Kearney. Without experiencing the symptom of bleeding gums, smokers need to regularly check the state of their teeth and gums to make sure they don’t have gingivitis.    

How to treat bleeding gums  

Prevention of gingivitis comes down to maintaining a basic, daily oral care routine of brushing twice a day, flossing once a day and rinsing with mouthwash. Adding an antiseptic mouthwash like to your routine twice daily can further reduce your risk of gum disease.  

It’s also important to consult your dentist or oral hygienist when you notice any difference in the appearance of your gums. “Your oral hygienist can determine your plaque and bleeding index and help you to reduce the levels for optimal oral health,” says Dr Welgemoed. 

“Whereas the general recommendation is for you to visit your dental professional every 6 months, it’s advisable that smokers and patients with periodontal disease make an appointment every 3 to 4 months,” Kearney advices.  

Angelique Kearney and Dr Janel Welgemoed are both members of theDental Academy.  



This post is sponsored by , produced by Brandstudio24 for Health24.


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